Category Archive: Knee

Nov
07

Jump Training Program

Basketball season is coming soon and preseason conditioning has begun. Every kid who has ever donned a pair of basketball shoes has dreamed about the thrill of jumping high into the sky toward the hoop to dunk a basketball. Yes, even those of us at 5 feet 8 inches and below can dream. While it …

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Sep
12

ACL injury prevention for female athletes: Part 2 of 2

Photo 15 - Jump Squats

ACL INJURY PREVENTION FOR FEMALE ATHLETES: Part 2 of 2 Guest Contributor: Danielle Maurice, SPT Various studies have shown that female athletes are on average four times more likely than males to tear their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee. Susceptibility for female athletes to an ACL injury is a multifaceted problem; anatomical, mechanical, …

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Sep
05

ACL injury prevention for female athletes: Part 1 of 2

ACL INJURY PREVENTION FOR FEMALE ATHLETES: Part 1 of 2 Guest Contributor: Danielle Maurice, SPT  Various studies have shown that female athletes are on average four times more likely than males to tear their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee. Susceptibility for female athletes to an ACL injury is a multifaceted problem; anatomical, mechanical, physiological …

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May
25

Knee OCD: A Pain in the Knee

Osteochondritis dissecans, also called OCD, is the most common cause of a loose body or fragment in the knee and is usually found in young males between the ages of ten and twenty. While this word sounds like a mouth full, breaking down its Latin derivation to its simplest terms makes it understandable: “osteo” means …

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Jan
26

Knee Replacement Updates – Part 3 of 3

Knee Replacement Updates – Part 3 of 3 Getting a new knee doesn’t quite mean what it used to. In younger, active patients — from about age 50 to 65 — having knee problems often means only one of the knee’s three compartments is degenerated. In the past, these patients relied on multiple conservative measures …

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Jan
19

Knee Replacement Updates – Part 2 of 3

Knee Replacement Updates – Part 2 of 3 There is good news for those in need of a knee replacement today! Recent advances have led to equally viable options for two very different patient populations; the younger active patient and the older and less medically stable patient. Recent studies conclude that knee replacement has had …

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Jan
12

Knee Replacement Updates – Part 1 of 3

Knee Replacement Updates: Part 1 of 3 There’s good news for those in need of a knee replacement. New advances have led to equally viable options for two very different patient populations: the younger, active person and the older, less medically stable individual. Knee or hip joint replacement has had a very positive impact on …

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Sep
09

Get the Most Out of Your New Knee: Part 2 of 2

Clam

Get the Most Out of Your New Knee: Part 2 of 2 Ted Schoch, PIAA football official from NEPA, has spent the past 9 months preparing for the high school football season with the same vigor and passion as a young athlete. You may have seen him biking through Dalton or running drills on the sports …

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Sep
02

Get the Most Out of Your New Knee – Part 1 of 2

One-Ankle Lowering

Part 1 of 2 Ted Schoch, PIAA football official  from NEPA, has spent the past 9 months preparing for the high school  football season with the same vigor and passion as a young athlete.  You may have seen him biking through Dalton or running drills on the  sports facilities at Abington Heights High School. He …

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Jul
22

Hip and Knee Replacement Updates

A few months ago, I wrote a column entitled, “How do you know when you are ready for a new knee?” I received several emails with requests for more information regarding hip and knee replacements such as, outcomes, complications, etc. Some readers wanted to know about heart disease and joint replacements. One reader wanted to know …

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Jun
03

Golf With Hip or Knee Replacements

Osteoarthritis  slowly develops in the weight-bearing joints, most commonly in the hip  and knee, creating pain, stiffness, swelling and loss of function. There  are many nonsurgical options such as: rest, weight loss, medication,  physical therapy, steroid injections, and viscosupplementation (SynviscR)  injections. However, when conservative measures fail, surgical intervention,  such as a joint replacement, becomes the …

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Oct
22

Knee Arthritis Part 2 of 2: Are You Ready for a New Knee?

Part 2 of 2 I have been advising my patients to exercise, keep active and walk as long as they can in order to stay mobile and healthy. However, seniors often tell me activities that require prolonged weight bearing or walking are limited by knee pain from arthritis. Six years ago, I discussed this topic …

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Oct
15

Battling Knee Arthritis – Part 1 of 2

Part 1 of 2 I have been advising my patients to exercise, keep active, and walk as long as they can in order to stay mobile and healthy. However, seniors often tell me activities that require prolonged walking are limited by knee pain from arthritis. They often ask, “What is arthritis of the knee?” How …

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Jul
09

Losing Weight Reduces Knee Pain

Naysayers often say, “Exercise junkies are killing their joints!” Well, it has always been my position that those who do nothing and are overweight destroy their joints as well. And, I would rather DO SOMETHING than nothing! New research from Ottawa, Canada supports my opinion. In addition to being a risk factor for many serious …

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Apr
09

Final Rehab Following ACL Reconstruction: Part 4 of 4

Unilateral Leg Stance

Part 4 of 4 Guest columnist: Janet Caputo, PT, DPT, OCS The past three columns have demonstrated the lengthy rehabilitation process following an ACL reconstruction.  The first four weeks after surgery can be a little uncomfortable and repetitive. The program focuses on controlling pain and swelling, increasing tolerance for weight bearing, restoring knee motion, and …

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Apr
02

Rehab Following ACL Reconstruction: Part 3 of 4

Phase 1: Quad Set

Part 3 of 4 Guest Columnist: Janet Caputo, PT, DPT, OCS Even though your surgeon probably reconstructed your ACL in about 2 to 2 ½ hours, your rehabilitation phase will require a much longer period of time. Typically, regaining the motion, strength, and function of your knee following ACL reconstruction requires more than three months. …

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Mar
26

ACL Reconstruction Surgery

Guest Columnist: Janet Caputo, PT, DPT, OCS Part 2 of 4 If your orthopaedic surgeon suspects an ACL tear, he/she will order an MRI (i.e. magnetic resonance imaging) to confirm his diagnosis.  The MRI results may also reveal damage to other critical structures in your knee such as the medial or lateral collateral ligaments on …

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Mar
19

ACL Injury May End Season But Not Career: Part 1 of 4 on ACL Injury

Part 1 of 4 What do Matthew Knowles, Danielle Dalessandro and Matthew Langan have in common? These local basketball stars had their season cut short due to devastating knee injuries: torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). However, while they may have ended their seasons, they did NOT end their careers! Knowles and Langan tore their ACL’s …

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Mar
05

Don’t Let a Hamstring Injury Become Your Achilles’ Heel: Part 2 of 2

Lateral Shuffle - Part 1

Guest Columnist: Janet Caputo, PT, DPT, OCS Hamstring injuries are common among athletes who participate in sports that require running, jumping, and kicking, especially when sudden changes in speed and direction are required. These injuries occur when the hamstring muscles are stretched too far or when caught off-guard during a sudden change in speed or …

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Feb
27

Don’t Let a Hamstring Injury Become Your Achilles’ Heel: Part 1 of 2

Hamstring Curl - Start

Guest Columnist: Janet Caputo, PT, DPT, OCS Tim Lavelle practiced long and hard to attain a position on the University of Scranton men’s basketball team.  Local long-distance runner Christopher Krall trained diligently for the Chevron Houston Marathon.  But despite their careful and persistent training, both sustained hamstring injuries early in the preseason.  How? Why? Hamstring …

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Jul
05

Hypermobility Hazards. Part 1 of 3 on Hypermobility

Hypermobility - Back

Guest Columnist: Janet Caputo, PT, OCS Are you hyperflexible? Do people call you a contortionist? Are you the main attraction at parties, like Dominique DelPrete and Amy Simrell Mifka, because you entertain your friends by twisting your arms and legs in gross directions? Do you excel in dance and gymnastics because of your exceptional joint …

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Apr
11

Hamstring Injuries in Spring Sports: Part 2

Last week’s column presented the cause and symptoms of a hamstring strain. This week will be dedicated to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this injury.

Apr
04

Hamstring Injuries in Spring Sports: Part 1

Hamstring strains are very common in spring sports in Northeastern Pennsylvania in great part due to our climate. Each spring, as the season begins, many athletes suffer from pain in the back of their thigh when they pull or strain the hamstring muscle from aggressive activity in cold temperatures, following a long winter layoff. This week’s column presents the cause and symptoms of a hamstring strain.

Apr
19

Cycling is Good Exercise, But Be Safe: Part 1 of 2

Bicycle riding is a great way to get cardiovascular exercise. It is easy, can be done indoors on a stationary bike or outdoors weather permitting. It is kind to your hip, knee and ankle joints. It can be inexpensive and enjoyed by the entire family. However, if not done properly, it can lead to problems.

Mar
15

Hamstring Injuries and Cool Weather: Part 1 of 2

Hamstring strains are very common in almost all sports. Moreover, participating in spring sports in the cool temperatures of NEPA presents additional challenges. New research shows that these injuries can be prevented by following a specifically designed intensive training program.

Oct
13

Steamtown Marathon III of III: Long Distance Running May Not Accelerate Knee Joint Arthritis

Last year an article in Skeletal Radiology received significant attention for disproving “current wisdom” about running and knee arthritis. Researchers from Austria used MRI imaging to examine the knees of participants before the 1997 Vienna Marathon. Ten years later, runners received an MRI before the 2007 race. Scans of those participating in both races were compared for changes. The results were very surprising.

Sep
28

Steamtown Marathon I of III: Prevention of Running Injuries

It is two weeks away from the 14th Steamtown Marathon. For this column, the first of three dedicated to those runners preparing for the big day,
I thought it fitting to share information regarding the prevention of running injuries for the marathon and recreational runner.

Sep
21

Knee Arthritis in Athletes: Part II of II

Last week I attempted to answer an email from Don Loftus, a teacher a Scranton Prep and former athlete who suffers from arthritis in his knees. This week will discuss the treatment options available to former athletes and others for the management of knee arthritis.

Sep
14

Knee Arthritis in Athletes: Part I of II

All joints suffer from wear and tear over time. Weight-bearing joints such as the hip, knee and ankle, tend to wear out faster than others. Moreover, trauma, from sports, overuse, occupation, or accidents, will expedite this process. This form of arthritis is called, osteoarthritis.

Jul
16

Prevalence of Arthritis to Skyrocket by 2030

Patrick McKenna, Editor for The Times-Tribune recently sent me copy of a press release regarding a warning from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that the prevalence of arthritis will increase significantly by 2030.

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